50 Ewe Lambs Available Now

These are the 50 best ewe lambs from our March/April 2016 lambing.  If you are looking for the right genetics to make your flock profitable, you’ve found them. Visit our Breeding Stock page for more info.

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Alberta Style Sheep Drive


I wanted to share some pictures from running the ewes home last week. We had 250 ewes grazing a few miles down the road at Alyssa’s parent’s farm this summer. Since we only have a 16′ trailer, hauling 250 ewes home ends up being an all day job for a couple guys. The crops were off all along the highway, so we knew we wouldn’t risk damaging any crops by running the ewes down the ditch. 


We had two hired hands as well as myself on quads while Alyssa’s dad drive the side-by-side. Alyssa followed behind with the truck and trailer to help make us more visible, and also to transport any ewes that tired out along the way. 


All in all it went really well. Our road is fairly busy so we had to be pretty cautious. There were a few times the sheep wanted to start crossing the road, and we had to quickly move them off. The hardest part was actually going past one of our neighbours places on the opposite side of the road when their hound started baying at our sheep. The ewes were really curious about the noise and started trying to cross the road all at the same time. Thankfully the dog was fenced in. Otherwise that could have gotten really interesting. 


Thankfully all of us and all the sheep made it home safely. Only one ewe with a sore leg tired out and had to be lifted into the stock trailer. 


If it works out again in the future I think this is the way we will move ewes to and from pasture. It saves a lot of time, and it’s a lot more fun! 

130’s a Crowd

When we were getting started with sheep we had a really hard time finding any information about space requirements for sheep handling pens. We made a calculated guess when we built our pens and chute, and in the end I’m pretty happy with how it turned out. I wanted to share some pictures with you to show what is working for us.

This post won’t go into too much detail about our chutes and the flow. I basically want to give you an idea about square footage requirements based on a given flock size.

In this picture we have 130 lambs penned up which are averaging about 80lbs/hd. 100 mature Rideau ewes fit in this pen about the same as these 130 lambs. The pen has some angles and curves in it, but is approximately 17ft x 31ft (527 square feet).

sheep-handling-pen

Across from our handling system we have one pen to sort into. If we are splitting a group, we are usually doing a two way split so one group will go into this pen while the other group is usually running back to the pen they came from down the barn. We have to swing panels across our feed alley to connect our handling system to the sorting pen, but it’s pretty quick to set up. This pen is 12ft x 23ft (276 square feet) the wedge shape coming off the handling system across the alley adds quite a bit of square footage as well. It nicely holds the group that we’re sorting out.

sheep-sorting-pen

Our flock is currently 550 breeding ewes and we typically find that we handling groups of around 100 head or less. We’ve found this to be a good sized handling pen for our flock size. It’s large enough that we aren’t constantly going down the barn to re-load the pen, but small enough that it’s not wasting a lot of square feet of barn space.

It’s not a perfect set up, but we’re happy with the way it is working for us. Hopefully it helps those of you out there who are building new sheep facilities.

 

2016 Ewe Lambs Available For Sale

Looking for top quality breeding ewes? Visit our Breeding Stock page to see what we have to offer.  We’re really excited about these ewe lambs!

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Opa’s Believe It or Not!

Here’s how it happened. I was working in the barn with Alyssa’s dad (Opa to our kids). We were installing some new water bowls in our lambing jugs. Lambing was already busy, and as new lambs were born we would put away the ewe with her new lambs in a jug. Towards the end of the day Opa was working near one of the lambing pens where one ewe had a nice little set of triplets. He brought her out of the pen, down the alley and into her 4×4 jug. We checked her milk, marked her down on the chart and, after finishing up our work, headed in for the night. 

Later that night, I came back to check ewes. From some distance away I could see the ewe with triplets. It looked like there were more than three lambs in her pen. It’s not unusual for a ewe to drop another lamb after a delay of a couple hours if she gets interrupted in the process. So, I went to check her. The closer I got the more lambs I saw. Four, five, six! Nope SEVEN! I couldn’t believe it! Seven healthy active lambs. A new record for us! We have seen six in the past, but they are rarely strong and healthy. These lambs were certainly below our normal birth weight but, considering that she had about 3 times as many lambs as our average ewe, the lambs looked amazing. She had them all up and drinking and she wasn’t rejecting any of them. 

The interesting thing is that if she had lambed out in the group pen I would have assumed that she was stealing some lambs from another ewe, but since she had the last 4 of them in an individual pen I knew they had to be hers. 

I put her out into a makeshift pen in the alley so that she would have enough room for all her lambs. In keeping with our protocol for large sets of multiples I fed colostrum to all the lambs to ease the competition pressure among the lambs and to make sure that all of them received adequate antibodies. In this case I had to put a blue spot on the lambs as I fed them to make sure that I didn’t miss one. 

The next morning she was still beautifully mothering all her lambs and everybody came out to have a look. What an exciting event. It made me think that if every ewe could manage this many lambs so well it would be great to have seven all the time, but it’s probably better if this is just an occasional surprise.

  

First Lambing Group 2016

As we catch up here between lambings I wanted to share a couple highlights from our first lambing group. 

Our first group of ewes was slated to start January 20. That was based on 145 day ewe gestation length. Most resources will tell you that a ewe’s gestation ranges from 147 to 149 days. The reason I use 145 days to calculate our lambing is so that we are prepared for the arrival of the first lambs.

I charted the number of ewes lambed out on each day of lambing. When ewes go into heat in the fall they tend to self synchronize to one degree or another. Heat will happen in cycles 17 days apart. So when I made my chart at the beginning of lambing I circled my ‘due date’ Jan 20 which was 145 days from when the rams went in. I also circled Feb 6 and 23. These were the 17 day spacings.

Lambing started out slow and although there wasn’t much of a bump on the graph it was pretty clear that the peak of the first cycle was around 147 to 149 days. With such a slow start we knew that there would likely be some pretty busy days ahead. Sure enough, things started to pick up significantly around Feb 4th and kept increasing until our peak on Feb 10 at 55 ewes in 24 hrs. All together about 75% (300hd) of the ewes lambed in the second cycle over a period of 14 days. The majority of those ewes lambed in a 7 day period (250hd).

Interestingly the lambing zeroed out on Feb 19 before a very small third and final cycle. The lambing had also dropped to one ewe in 24 hours between the first and second cycle. So we definitely saw a very strong synchronization effect from this breeding. We had flushed the ewes with barley, but no teaser rams were used. I suspect that, because the majority of the ewes lambed in the second cycle, the ram introduction at breeding caused an effect similar to what a teaser ram would cause. Some of the ewes cycled immediately and where bred while most had a non fertile heat and then a fertile heat after a typical 17 day period. 

  

In any case it was an interesting thing to track our daily lambing numbers. I’m hoping to continue doing so. It helped me anticipate the busy days and focus my energy. 

I’d be interested to hear if anyone else tries charting their lambing progress. Share your experience and what you learn from it. 

– Miles